M.Sc Special education

(3 customer reviews)

480,000.00

A study of organizational structures, programmatic procedures, policies, resources, and guidelines essential to the delivery of educational services for children with special needs.

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Specs

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Description

Course Overview

A study of organizational structures, programmatic procedures, policies, resources, and guidelines essential to the delivery of educational services for children with special needs.

UNIVERSITIES IN BENIN REPUBLIC…

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Course objectives

At the student should be able to;

  • Analyze historical and cultural views of disabilities.
  • Describe the 14 disability categories identified by IDEA.
  • Generate a definition of “disability.”
  • Identify special education terms, models, and processes
  • Identify developmental milestones and explain how disabilities may affect developmental processes.
  • Describe medical conditions that affect individuals with disabilities.
  • Identify types of assistive technology.
  • Identify gifted and talented students with special needs.
  • Identify controversies in special education.

 

Admission Requirement

Any applicant who meets the minimum entry requirements for admission into the University may be granted admission, the requirements are :

  • An A’ Level Certificate (a Degree, HND or PGD) with 2:2, Lower credit, or Pass respectively and above.
  • Transcript of the A’Level result.
  • Copy of International Passport data page.
  • A copy of CV.

REGISTRATION PROCESS

To register for any of the available courses take the following steps

  • Click on courses on the menu bar or apply now button to pick a course
  • After selecting the course, click apply now to add to cart
  • View the cart to fill the application form
  • Submit the form to go to the payment page
  • Complete the payment form and select method of payment and submit.
  • You will receive an email letting you know of your registration and your application status
  • You will be contacted by one of our admission team member to guide you on the admission.
  • After making the payment of application fee admission letter will be sent to your email with fee structure.
  • You will need to make payment of at least 70% of the tuition and acceptance fee for you to be granted access to the course applied for.
  • After making the payment an email will be sent to your email with access link to your registered course.
  • You study online and can come to school every semester for exams.

FEE STRUCTURE

Tuition per Session

Tuition Fee = 480,000

Application = 10,ooo

Acceptance = 20,000

Course kit =₦30,000

Administrative Charges = 60,000

Project supervision = 20,000

Convocation = 40,000

Total = ₦660,000

CURRICULUM

Teaching Students with Reading Difficulties and Disabilities

Introduction

The purpose of this resource is to assist educators in teaching students who are experiencing significant difficulties, or who have a disability in reading and written expression. The document provides a general description of learning disabilities with a focus on the most common type of disability–reading disability (Kibby & Hynd, 2001). The terms reading disability, reading disorder, and dyslexia are used interchangeably in the literature. For the purposes of this document, the term reading disability will be used. Proficient reading and writing skills are critical to success. If students are not competent readers, they are at risk for academic, behavioural, social and emotional difficulties. Students with learning disabilities have the potential to be successful academically and socially. Teachers can change the trajectory for children at risk for failure in reading by intervening early and providing explicit, intensive, and extensive instruction. The expectation is that students are taught listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and representing skills throughout their school careers. When students continue to struggle with the acquisition of proficient literacy skills, appropriate adaptations need to be made to enable them to successfully meet the demands of the curriculum.

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Understanding Learning Disabilities

UNDERSTANDING LEARNING DISABILITIES
The hallmark characteristic of a learning disability is an individual’s academic underachievement in reading, writing, and/or mathematics despite the presence of average to above average intelligence, appropriate instruction, regular school attendance, and favourable environmental factors. The Learning Disabilities Association of Canada (LDAC) provides a national definition of learning disabilities .

Official National Definition of Learning Disabilities

“Learning Disabilities” refer to a number of disorders, which may affect the acquisition, organization, retention, understanding, or use of verbal or nonverbal information. These disorders affect learning in individuals who otherwise demonstrate at least average abilities essential for thinking and/or reasoning. As such, learning disabilities are distinct from global intellectual deficiency. Learning disabilities result from impairments in one or more processes related to perceiving, thinking, remembering, or learning. These include, but are not limited to language processing, phonological processing, visual spatial processing, processing speed, memory and attention, and executive functions (e.g., planning and decision making).

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Reading Development and Instruction

Reading is a complex process made up of several interlocking skills and processes (Tankersley, 2003). These skills and strategies are employed before, during, and after reading.
Reading is a process by which the reader makes personal connections with a text to construct meaning. Reading and responding to a text are integral parts of language learning. Effective readers employ a wide repertoire of meaning-making (comprehension) strategies that they can deploy independently with a range of texts. Effective readers understand and remember what they read. They can summarize and discuss the content and demonstrate their comprehension of the text. They can analyze and evaluate what they have read. Effective readers recognize words quickly and efficiently. They demonstrate high word recognition. They possess strong fluency skills.

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Language development and literacy

Language Development at an Early Age

Introduction
Because language is central to so many aspects of human life – cognition, social interaction, education and vocation – valid identification, prevention, and treatment of language disorders is a high priority for the therapeutic professions. Delay and/or difficulty in beginning to use language is one of the most common causes of parental concern for young children brought to pediatricians and other professionals. Delay may indicate specific difficulty with language, or it may be an early indicator of a broader problem such as developmental delay or autism.

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[/academia_course_lesson][academia_course_lesson icon_type=”fontawesome” icon_fontawesome=”fa fa-check” badge=”lecture” title=”Factors that Influence Language Development” estimate_time=”30M”]Introduction
Because language is central to so many aspects of human life – cognition, social interaction, education and vocation – valid identification, prevention, and treatment of language disorders is a high priority for the therapeutic professions. Delay and/or difficulty in beginning to use language is one of the most common causes of parental concern for young children brought to pediatricians and other professionals. Delay may indicate specific difficulty with language, or it may be an early indicator of a broader problem such as developmental delay or autism.

[more…]

 

Biological Bases of Language Development

Introduction
Recent advances in neuroimaging allow for the investigation of the neurobiological bases of language and the effects of environmental and genetic factors on neural organization for language in children. Increasingly, these methods are being used to characterize the developmental timecourse of different language subsystems and to more precisely examine the effects of language experience, and the timing of these effects, on the development of different language functions and on the neural mechanisms which mediate these subsystems.

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The Individual Education Plan

INTRODUCTION

This revised resource guide replaces Part E,”The Individual Education Plan (IEP)”, of the ministry document Special Education: A Guide for Educators, 2001 (pages dated October 21), as well as the 1998 publication Individual Education Plan (IEP): Resource Guide. The present guide is intended to assist school boards in complying with the requirements for IEPs that are set out in Regulation 181/98 and implementing the policies set out in Individual Education Plans: Standards for Development, Program Planning, and Implementation, 2000.
This guide is intended to help teachers and others working with students with special needs to develop, implement, and monitor high-quality IEPs. A five-step process is recommended. Suggestions and examples are provided, but IEPs, by their very nature, will be individualized on the basis of the particular requirements of the student.

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SET THE DIRECTION

Establish a Collaborative Approach – The IEP Team
The IEP needs to be developed collaboratively, both by those who know the student best and by those who will be working directly with the student. Part C: Program Planning of Special Education: A Guide for Educators, 2001 contains information on in-school teams. The model described there would be ideal for an IEP team, and its use is recommended wherever possible.
The membership of an IEP team can and should vary according to the needs of the individual student. Members may include, for example, the student, the student’s parents, the student’s teachers, the guidance counsellor, the principal, appropriate special education staff and support personnel, and staff from community agencies, as appropriate.
As noted earlier, regardless of who is coordinating the IEP process, decisions related to the program planning sections of an Individual Education Plan need to be made by the individual who teaches the student and prepares the student’s report card – usually the classroom teacher.

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IMPLEMENT THE IEP

Put the IEP Into Practice
The classroom teacher and support personnel are directly responsible for implementing the program and services outlined in a student’s IEP. Their responsibilities are outlined below.

Classroom Teachers

Classroom teachers need to be aware of the instructional, environmental, and assessment accommodations that are recorded in the student’s IEP. The teacher should not feel restricted to using only the instructional and environmental accommodations listed. As the teacher-student relationship develops, the teacher should explore a variety of strategies that could enhance the student’s ability to learn, and make note of successful strategies in the student’s IEP. Care must be taken, however, to use only the assessment accommodations listed in the IEP. Teachers should consult the lists of permitted accommodations for provincial assessments when considering assessment accommodations.

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3 reviews for M.Sc Special education

  1. Cobus Bester

    This album proves why The Woo are the best band ever. Best music ever!

  2. Maria

    Can’t wait to start mixin’ with this one! Irba-irr-Up-up-up-up-date your theme!

  3. Beninfo247

    the quest for knowledge is high,and your platform is a medium.

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